Meet Bishop W. Nicholas Knisely

Bishop Nicholas KniselyBishop Knisely became our diocesan bishop in November 2012. He was born and raised in Pennsylvania and met his wife Karen while they were both students at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster. Later, as a graduate student at the University of Delaware, he decided to leave behind his studies of Physics and Astronomy and was sent to Yale/Berkeley Divinity School to study for the priesthood. He completed his Masters of Divinity and was ordained to the diaconate in Delaware in 1991, then to the priesthood in 1992. In 2013 he received an Honorary Doctorate of Divinity, also from Berkeley Divinity School at Yale.

Bishop Knisely previously served as a priest in Delaware, Western and Eastern Pennsylvania, and as Dean of the Cathedral in Phoenix Arizona. He has been active in a number of ministries with particular focus in the areas of homelessness, communications, college and youth, finance, and ecumenical relations. He taught Physics and Astronomy for nearly seven years at Lehigh University while he was serving in Bethlehem PA. He was the first chair of the General Convention Standing Commission on Communications and Technology and was part of the Moravian-Episcopal Dialog that drew up the full communion agreement between the two denominations. Karen and Nicholas Knisely have been married for 30 years and have an adult daughter named Kenney.

Connect with Bishop Knisely

Email: bishop@episcopalri.org
Twitter: @wnknisely
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BishopWNKnisely/
Blog: http://entangledstates.org
Instagram: @wnknisely

Find out which church the Bishop is visiting –VISITATION SCHEDULE

From the Bishop

  • Jesus’ Love has Power over Death.
    Sermon for Sunday, Lent 5A, 2020 The readings for this weekend speak to God’s power over for the forces of death and destruction. They testify to our collective memory of how Jesus entered human history and reshaped our …
  • We depend on one another now
    The most intense insight I’ve had during the beginnings of the COVID-19 crisis is how profoundly connected we all are. I knew it intellectually, and I believed it theologically, but to see it being demonstrated so direct …
  • Sheltering as an Act of Love and Hope
    Holy One, give us courage for this moment. Let us meet each day and its challenges as it comes. Give us a godly hope and then let us be a sign and a light for others. Protect all those who lives are in danger. Bless the …
  • Companions along the Way
    Some of you may have wondered about the letters that come after my signature. “SOSc” stands for the Society of Ordained Scientists. It’s a “dispersed” religious community, and I have taken my life vows as a member of tha …
  • Twitter and the collapse of coalitions.
    Walter Ong, a Jesuit who studied linguistics was fascinated by the difference between oral and literary cultures. Oral cultures value one sort of communication structure and literate ones another. (The difference is expl …
  • Living at Human Speed
    We’ve become slaves to the pace of the technology in our lives. My “epiphany” this first week of Epiphany was that I don’t have to let myself get caught up in the machine pace of daily life, especially when I’m on a brea …
  • 2020 foresight
    Daily reading of the Bible has changed who I am. I believe it can change you too.
  • Read this: Reformed Episcopalians and Anglo-Catholics Together in Witness I — Earth and Altar
    That "something else" has often endorsed a utopian political agenda that aspires to bring about the Kingdom of God on earth through human effort.
  • Merry Christmas!
    May God gift you with the awareness that Jesus is with us, with you, right now. May Jesus, walking beside you in this Christmas season, be a light that makes your burdens easy and your heart sing with joy. +Nicholas
  • Support for the Governor’s ban today on flavored e-Cigarettes
    I speak as a faith leader, and as a scientist. I want to publicly thank Governor Raimondo for her decision to ban flavored E-Vaping products in this state. Better to stop and evaluate than to risk people’s lives. There a …