Meet Bishop W. Nicholas Knisely

Bishop Nicholas KniselyBishop Knisely became our diocesan bishop in November 2012. He was born and raised in Pennsylvania and met his wife Karen while they were both students at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster. Later, as a graduate student at the University of Delaware, he decided to leave behind his studies of Physics and Astronomy and was sent to Yale/Berkeley Divinity School to study for the priesthood. He completed his Masters of Divinity and was ordained to the diaconate in Delaware in 1991, then to the priesthood in 1992. In 2013 he received an Honorary Doctorate of Divinity, also from Berkeley Divinity School at Yale.

Bishop Knisely previously served as a priest in Delaware, Western and Eastern Pennsylvania, and as Dean of the Cathedral in Phoenix Arizona. He has been active in a number of ministries with particular focus in the areas of homelessness, communications, college and youth, finance, and ecumenical relations. He taught Physics and Astronomy for nearly seven years at Lehigh University while he was serving in Bethlehem PA. He was the first chair of the General Convention Standing Commission on Communications and Technology and was part of the Moravian-Episcopal Dialog that drew up the full communion agreement between the two denominations. Karen and Nicholas Knisely have been married for 30 years and have an adult daughter named Kenney.

Connect with Bishop Knisely

Email: bishop@episcopalri.org
Twitter: @wnknisely
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BishopWNKnisely/
Personal Blog: http://entangledstates.org
Diocesan Blog: https://www.episcopalri.org/connect/the-bishops-blog/
Instagram: @wnknisely

Find out which church the Bishop is visiting –VISITATION SCHEDULE

From the Bishop

  • Do you want to be healed?
    I’m not aware that I’ve ever preached on this passage of scripture before today. The gospel reading from John tells of a man who waited thirty-eight years to be healed, waiting by the waters of the pool of Beth-zatha, ne …
  • Why can people always count on Christians being jerks to each other?
    Why is so hard to love one another? It’s such a rare thing that the powers of this world plan on our apparently endless capacity for division and strife in the Church. The division starts from the beginning and continues …
  • So you’ve heard the voice of the Good Shephard… now what?
    The fourth Sunday after Easter is traditionally called Good Shephard Sunday; and we read passages from Scripture where Jesus explains that he is the Good Shephard, the one that will lay down his life for his sheep. This …
  • How do we feed the sheep, or tend the lambs?
    This week we hear the final chapter of John’s Gospel. Like much of John’s Gospel, it’s different but similar to the other stories about Jesus. But this is placed at the very end of the Gospel, and follows a few verses th …
  • He showed them his hands and his side. Then they were glad…
    The past is a foreign place. That’s a point made regularly by a favorite author of mind. It’s a reminder that when we try to understand the mindset of people for distant from us in history, we are always going to fall sh …
  • What is our apostolic witness to Easter Joy today?
    The first apostle, the Apostle to the Apostles, was Mary Magdalene. That’s a surprise to some people, but it is an ancient tradition and today’s Easter Gospel closes with the reasons we make that claim. But while Mary wa …
  • Palm Sunday: how do we respond to terrifying evil?
    This Palm Sunday, like many before, is being observed in a time of war. And as in many previous wars, the evil acts committed against the innocent, young and old, strip away any sense we might have had that civilization …
  • We are saved by the same love that we so often reject
    Newsletter article April 6 2022 We are watching the images from Ukraine with horror. The human suffering of this war is unimaginable. I have had to turn off the news on several occasions because I couldn’t bear to witnes …
  • Are we using the Church to meet our needs? For own ends?
    This week’s Gospel tells the story of the extravagant act of adoration by Mary toward Jesus. She anoints his feet with something like $30,000 worth of perfumed oil. Judas sees it and objects that the money could have bee …
  • The Church is called to extravagant acts of reconciliation
    This Sunday’s Gospel is one of the most familiar parables in the canon of scripture. It’s the story of the Prodigal Son, an arresting story that Jesus told to the shock and surprise of the people who originally heard it. …